Real Estate Math

Of the various maths involved in residential real estate, calculating the value of home improvement projects is the most difficult. Return on investment is ultimately determined by the market. There are no definitive answers, unlike there are in the problem above. A quick quiz: Which of these projects tends to provide the best return on investment for sellers?    A. Back Yard Patio Installation    B. Garage Door Replacement    C. Minor Kitchen Remodel    D. Window Replacement Buyers

Alert: Extreme Cold Ahead

The precipitation is getting all the headlines, but the extreme cold predicted to follow is just as concerning. Take a couple minutes today to make sure your house is ready for extended single-digit temperatures. Check your heating oil level, drain the exterior spigots, and bring in some firewood if you regularly burn fires. If you have drafty windows or doors, then consider buying insulating strips to temporarily plug the cracks. Stay warm, and make sure

A Well Maintained Building

The well maintained building at 39 Woodland Street in Hartford is identified by the Structures and Styles book as the Melancthon W. Jacobus, Sr. House. Its Tudor Revival architecture is in excellent condition 110 years after construction! Kudos to the State for the recent maintenance to keep the 29,571 square foot structure looking good. The building is currently the central office for the Connecticut Technical Education and Career Center.

Repairing Crumbling Foundations

Photo: CT Department of Housing Property owners in a portion of Connecticut have been struggling with foundation problems. The concrete mix used to build their homes included pyrrhotite, which is a mineral that causes foundations to deteriorate due to exposure to air and water. There is no way to repair a defective foundation. The only way to save a home with pyrrhotite is to replace the foundation, a very expensive project. Home insurers didn’t think

Close the Door

Close the Door

“Close the door” is a time-tested piece of advice. Growing up in Vermont, the main reason to close the door was to keep the heat from getting out. Apparently barns are notorious for having open doors where I’m from. Being told to close the door was generally followed by a comment about how we don’t live in a barn. Which was true, we didn’t live in a barn. There’s a strong case to be made